Tag Archives: New York

Overconfident e-mail recipients helping phishing succeed

New York, Jan 9 (IANS) Most of the people believe they are smarter than those behind email phishing scams which is why so many fall easily into a trap and lose money, an Indian-origin researcher has found.

According to H.R. Rao from University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), overconfident e-mail recipients are helping phishing succeed.

“A big advantage for phishers is self efficacy. Many times, people think they know more than they actually do and are smarter than someone trying to pull of a scam via an e-mail,” said Rao who is AT&T Distinguished Chair in Infrastructure Assurance and Security.

Today, phishing e-mails often look like messages from companies ordinary people recognise and trust.

“They’re getting very good at mimicking the logos of popular companies,” Rao noted.

In his study, Rao utilised an experimental survey that had subjects choose between the genuine and the sinister e-mails that he and his colleagues had created for the project.

Afterward, the subjects explained why they made their choices, which allowed Rao to classify which type of overconfidence was playing a role in their decision-making processes.

According to Rao, people will continue to be victimised by phishing scams until the public becomes better educated and, subsequently, less overconfident.

“Thousands of e-mails are sent out every day with the aim of harming someone or gaining access to their financial information. Avoiding that kind of damage is entirely in our own hands,” Rao suggested in a paper that appeared in the Journal of the Association for Information Systems.

–IANS

na/bg

How A Single Typo Led To The Unraveling Of Hillary Clinton's Campaign

One of the worst and most public email hacks in political history began with a typo, a report in The New York Times revealed on Tuesday.

An aide to Hillary Clinton’s campaign chair, John Podesta, saw a warning email in his inbox back in March, claiming to be from Google. Podesta needed to change his Gmail password immediately, the email said.

Most adult internet users know by now never to click a link in emails like this ― phishing is fairly common. Even unsophisticated tech types are hip to the scam. So, before responding, Podesta’s aide showed the email to another staffer, a computer technician.

And, well, what happens next should be a lesson to anyone who types and sends emails and texts without reading them first. (That’s everybody who emails and texts.) 

From the Times (bolding is HuffPost’s):

“This is a legitimate email,” Charles Delavan, a Clinton campaign aide, replied to another of Mr. Podesta’s aides, who had noticed the alert. “John needs to change his password immediately.”

With another click, a decade of emails that Mr. Podesta maintained in his Gmail account — a total of about 60,000 — were unlocked for the Russian hackers. Mr. Delavan, in an interview, said that his bad advice was a result of a typo: He knew this was a phishing attack, as the campaign was getting dozens of them. He said he had meant to type that it was an “illegitimate” email, an error that he said has plagued him ever since.

The email hack was a huge distraction at the end of the presidential campaign, serving as fodder for Republican attacks and diverting the attention of key players on Clinton’s team. The Podesta email hack was separate from an equally damaging attack on the Democratic National Committee.

(There was some upside: Like getting a peek at Podesta’s risotto recipe. And seeing what an honest badass Center for American Progress President Neera Tanden is.)

Any journalist who’s ever accidentally published a story on pubic policy (sorry) knows that typos can be cruel. But this was beyond that, obviously. “Most consequential typo in human history?” Sahil Kapur asked on Twitter.

Others wondered if this was just someone crying typo instead of owning what is likely the biggest mistake of a career.  

If he had meant to type “an illegitimate” email, why did he get the article wrong and write “a legitimate” email, one Twitter conspiracy theorist wondered. Others argued it’s odd that Delevan would advise Podesta to change his password, since the phishing email was obviously bogus. 

Still, the advice seems reasonable. If you’re the chair of a U.S. presidential campaign and discover you’re the target of hackers, it seems perfectly rational to immediately change your password. The attackers, after all, could be pursuing multiple ways into your account. 

And the “illegitimate email” line could have been confused by the Times’ phrasing. Delevan could’ve meant to write this is a “legitimate attack.”

Also, he included the correct Gmail address to change a password. If Podesta or his aide had used that, no harm no fowl foul.

Democrats prod Republicans to run fair probe of Russian hacking

Russian-sponsored efforts to hack into systems to sway the U.S. election included relentless “phishing” attacks and hundreds of shady emails, but the key that unlocked the proverbial gates to tens of thousands of emails from top Hillary Clinton staffers was simply an innocuous typo written by a campaign aide, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

In a wide-ranging analysis of how the hacking scandal — which may have helped turn the race for Donald Trump and which is now the subject of intelligence agency investigations — unfolded, The Times traced one of the Russians’ most successful penetrations of Clinton’s orbit to an email written from Charles Delavan, an aide to the Democratic nominee.

In March 2016, Delavan flagged what clearly appeared to be a phishing-scam for other Clinton aides, including John Podesta, directing them to change their passwords, but his warning included a typo that may have altered the course of history.

“This is a legitimate email. John needs to change his password immediately, and ensure that two-factor authentication is turned on his account,” he wrote in an email, obtained by The Times, to other aides for Podesta and Clinton after identifying a clear phishing attempt.

Reince Priebus claims Trump receives intelligence briefing daily

PHOTO TAKEN FEB. 27, 2015

In a written statement, No. 2 House Democrat Steny Hoyer (pictured) of Maryland and the top Democrats on six House committees said they wanted a congressional probe of Moscow’s interference.

(J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

Delavan, however, had meant to type “illegitimate,” he told The Times.

But it was too late.

The Russians subsequently gained access to tens of thousands of Podesta’s emails, leaked them to WikiLeaks, and watched chaos ensue as American voters gobbled up stories about the email’s juicy revelations.

The latest revelations of the hacking saga came a week after the CIA itself reportedly concluded that Russia definitely hacked various systems in the U.S. in an attempt to meddle in the election in Trump’s favor.

Jerusalem’s mayor Nir Barkat hopes Trump will move U.S. Embassy

As a result, Congressional Democrats have pushed their Republican counterparts to conduct their own investigations into the intelligence community’s assertions.

In a written statement Tuesday, No. 2 House Democrat Steny Hoyer of Maryland and the top Democrats on six House committees said they wanted a congressional probe of Moscow’s interference “that is truly bipartisan, that is comprehensive, that will not be restricted by jurisdictional lines.”

Not Released (NR)

Trump (pictured) on Sunday called the CIA’s contention “ridiculous” and blamed the disclosures of the agency’s assessment on Democrats who he said were embarrassed over losing last month’s election.

(Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) said Monday that they, too, backed investigations by each chamber’s intelligence committee into the CIA’s finding that Russia interfered with the election.

McConnell, however, declined to say whether he agreed with the CIA assertion that Russian hacking and public release of Democrats’ emails during the presidential campaign were designed to aid Trump.

Triple H said Donald Trump couldn’t tell if a WWE skit was fake

But in a noteworthy departure from Trump’s rejection of that conclusion, McConnell said the Senate Intelligence Committee would study the issue.

The remarks by McConnell and Ryan contrasted with Trump’s oft-repeated praise of Putin (c.) and the president-elect’s scoffing at the CIA’s findings.

The remarks by McConnell and Ryan contrasted with Trump’s oft-repeated praise of Putin (c.) and the president-elect’s scoffing at the CIA’s findings.

(NATALIA KOLESNIKOVA/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump on Sunday called the CIA’s contention “ridiculous” and blamed the disclosures of the agency’s assessment on Democrats who he said were embarrassed over losing last month’s election.

With News Wire Services 

Tags:
russia
hackers
donald trump
donald trump transition
mitch mcconnell
paul ryan
vladimir putin

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